1. slaughterhouse90210:

“The pictures do not lie, but neither do they tell the whole story. They are merely a record of time passing, the outward evidence.”  ― Paul Auster, Travels in the Scriptorium
    High Res

    slaughterhouse90210:

    “The pictures do not lie, but neither do they tell the whole story. They are merely a record of time passing, the outward evidence.”
    ― Paul Auster, Travels in the Scriptorium

  2. That said, stereotypes aren’t so much about people totally projecting things that completely aren’t there but about people having a framework with which they interpret things that actually are there. It’s not that racism causes people to see (for example) belligerent teenage boys where there are none, but that a white belligerent teenage boy is just seen as himself while a black belligerent teenage boy is part of a pattern, a script, and when people blindly follow the scripts in their head that leads to discrimination and prejudice. So yeah, it is a fact, I think, that I was a bit off-putting in my Jeopardy! appearance—hyper-focused on the game, had an intense stare, clicked madly on the buzzer, spat out answers super-fast, wasn’t too charming in the interviews, etc. But this may have taken root in people’s heads because I’m an Asian and the “Asian mastermind” is a meme in people’s heads that it wouldn’t have otherwise.Look, we all know that there’s a trope in the movies where someone of a minority race is flattened out into just being “good at X” and that the white protagonist is the one we root for because unlike the guy who’s just “good at X” the protagonist has human depth, human relationships, a human point of view—and this somehow makes him more worthy of success than the antagonist who seems to exist just to be good at X. So we root for Rocky against black guys who, by all appearances, really are better boxers than he is, because unlike them Rocky isn’t JUST a boxer, he has a girlfriend, he has hopes, he has dreams, etc. This comes up over and over again in movies where the athletic black competitor is set up as the “heel”—look at the black chick in Million Dollar Baby and how much we’re pushed to hate her. Look at all this “Great White Hope” stuff, historically, with Joe Louis. So is it any surprise that this trope comes into play with Asians? That the Asian character in the movie is the robotic, heartless, genius mastermind who is only pure intellect and whom we’re crying out to be defeated by some white guy who may not be as brainy but has more pluck, more heart, more humanity? It’s not just Flash Gordon vs. Ming the Merciless, it’s stuff like how in the pilot episode of Girls Hannah gets fired in favor of an overachieving Asian girl who’s genuinely better at her job than she is (the Asian girl knows Photoshop and she doesn’t) and we’re supposed to sympathize with Hannah. Okay, here’s one more comment from the Internet that kind of encapsulates it. The kind of un-self-awareness of what someone is saying when they say they’d prefer I not win because I try too hard at the game, work too hard at it, care too much about it, and that they’d prefer that a “likable average Joe” win. This is disturbing because it amounts to basically an attack on competence, a desire to bust people who work very hard and have very strong natural gifts down in favor of “likable average Joes”—and it’s disturbing because the subtext is frequently that to be “likable” and “average” you have to have other traits that are comforting and appealing to an “average Joe” audience, like white skin and an American accent.

    - Arthur Chu to Ken Jennings (via pushinghoopswithsticks)

    My duuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuude.

    (via cordjefferson)

    Science, Mr. White

    (via nickdouglas)

    woah

    (via zombiecuddle)

    (via barryjenkins)

  3. theawesomefarm:

"In art there is no progress, only fluctuations of intensity." - Robert Hughes
    High Res

    theawesomefarm:

    "In art there is no progress, only fluctuations of intensity." - Robert Hughes

  4. ryanjenq:

    Andre Wagner, Photographer

    abstractelements.com
    abstractelements.tumblr.com/

    One of my favorite New York transplants. 

    (via abstractelements)

  5. Jon Stewart compares the media’s treatment of Justin Bieber and Rob Ford to the treatment of Seattle Seahawks cornerback Richard Sherman.

    (Source: sandandglass, via yahighway)

  6. slaughterhouse90210:

“I see that there will be no end to imperfection, or to doing things the wrong way. Even if you grow up, no matter how hard you scrub, whatever you do, there will always be some other stain or spot on your face or stupid act, somebody frowning.”― Margaret Atwood, Cat’s Eye
    High Res

    slaughterhouse90210:

    “I see that there will be no end to imperfection, or to doing things the wrong way. Even if you grow up, no matter how hard you scrub, whatever you do, there will always be some other stain or spot on your face or stupid act, somebody frowning.”
    ― Margaret Atwood,
    Cat’s Eye

  7. Then she and I sat on the floor of the front room with a bottle of wine and became friends again, talking about books instead of life.
    Hateship, Friendship, Courtship, Loveship, Marriage by Alice Munro (via yahighway)

    (Source: literatebitch, via yahighway)

  8. High Res
  9. anniebecoming:

    brightwalldarkroom:

    "Sitting Dance" - Gene Kelly and Donald O’Connor

    Legendary dance men doing what legendary dancing men do - a sit-down medley of their most famous dance scenes (ending with a full-on stand-up number from Singin’ in the Rain, because one can only sit still for so long, after all.)

    (from “Pontiac Star Parade”, 1959)

    Thoughts:

    1. I love dancers of this era, I think mostly because I am so enamored with tap dancing (can’t explain it — or rather, I can’t explain it briefly).

    2. If bodies could exude more grace and charisma, I have yet to meet them. The magic is in how easy it looks.

    3. The fit of those clothes. Impeccable, and I wish men of today would take note.

  10. slaughterhouse90210:

 “They moved in dance steps too intricate for the noninitiated eye to imitate or understand. Clearly they were of one soul. Handsome, rangy, wildly various, they were bound in total loyalty, not by oath, but by the simple, unquestioning belongingness of part of one organism.”— Louise Erdrich, Love Medicine

    slaughterhouse90210:

    “They moved in dance steps too intricate for the noninitiated eye to imitate or understand. Clearly they were of one soul. Handsome, rangy, wildly various, they were bound in total loyalty, not by oath, but by the simple, unquestioning belongingness of part of one organism.”
    — Louise Erdrich, Love Medicine