1. More than half of the students who enroll in for-profit colleges—many of them veterans, single mothers, and other low- and middle-income people aiming for jobs like medical technician, diesel mechanic or software coder—drop out within about four months. Many of these colleges have been caught using deceptive advertising and misleading prospective students about program costs and job placement rates. Although the for-profits promise that their programs are affordable, the real cost can be nearly double that of Harvard or Stanford. But the quality of the programs are often weak, so even students who manage to graduate often struggle to find jobs beyond the Office Depot shifts they previously held. The US Department of Education recently reported that 72 percent of the for-profit college programs it analyzed produced graduates who, on average, earned less than high school dropouts.
    David Halperin, "The Perfect Lobby: How One Industry Captured Washington, DC" The Nation. April 3, 2014 (via jalylah)
  2. Berlin Nights. 
Via: The Awesome Farm
    High Res

    Berlin Nights. 

    Via: The Awesome Farm

  3. secondsminuteshours:

Mari, Rashid & Dave.
    High Res
  4. lostinurbanism:

Mrs. Rosalee Wormley, Chicago by Lee Balterman 

    lostinurbanism:

    Mrs. Rosalee Wormley, Chicago by Lee Balterman 

    (via jalylah)

  5. pbump:

    People see black kids as less innocent and less young than white kids. People including cops.

    (via cordjefferson)

  6. Oh America.

    (Source: knowledgeequalsblackpower, via yahighway)

  7. slaughterhouse90210:

“The pictures do not lie, but neither do they tell the whole story. They are merely a record of time passing, the outward evidence.”  ― Paul Auster, Travels in the Scriptorium
    High Res

    slaughterhouse90210:

    “The pictures do not lie, but neither do they tell the whole story. They are merely a record of time passing, the outward evidence.”
    ― Paul Auster, Travels in the Scriptorium

  8. That said, stereotypes aren’t so much about people totally projecting things that completely aren’t there but about people having a framework with which they interpret things that actually are there. It’s not that racism causes people to see (for example) belligerent teenage boys where there are none, but that a white belligerent teenage boy is just seen as himself while a black belligerent teenage boy is part of a pattern, a script, and when people blindly follow the scripts in their head that leads to discrimination and prejudice. So yeah, it is a fact, I think, that I was a bit off-putting in my Jeopardy! appearance—hyper-focused on the game, had an intense stare, clicked madly on the buzzer, spat out answers super-fast, wasn’t too charming in the interviews, etc. But this may have taken root in people’s heads because I’m an Asian and the “Asian mastermind” is a meme in people’s heads that it wouldn’t have otherwise.Look, we all know that there’s a trope in the movies where someone of a minority race is flattened out into just being “good at X” and that the white protagonist is the one we root for because unlike the guy who’s just “good at X” the protagonist has human depth, human relationships, a human point of view—and this somehow makes him more worthy of success than the antagonist who seems to exist just to be good at X. So we root for Rocky against black guys who, by all appearances, really are better boxers than he is, because unlike them Rocky isn’t JUST a boxer, he has a girlfriend, he has hopes, he has dreams, etc. This comes up over and over again in movies where the athletic black competitor is set up as the “heel”—look at the black chick in Million Dollar Baby and how much we’re pushed to hate her. Look at all this “Great White Hope” stuff, historically, with Joe Louis. So is it any surprise that this trope comes into play with Asians? That the Asian character in the movie is the robotic, heartless, genius mastermind who is only pure intellect and whom we’re crying out to be defeated by some white guy who may not be as brainy but has more pluck, more heart, more humanity? It’s not just Flash Gordon vs. Ming the Merciless, it’s stuff like how in the pilot episode of Girls Hannah gets fired in favor of an overachieving Asian girl who’s genuinely better at her job than she is (the Asian girl knows Photoshop and she doesn’t) and we’re supposed to sympathize with Hannah. Okay, here’s one more comment from the Internet that kind of encapsulates it. The kind of un-self-awareness of what someone is saying when they say they’d prefer I not win because I try too hard at the game, work too hard at it, care too much about it, and that they’d prefer that a “likable average Joe” win. This is disturbing because it amounts to basically an attack on competence, a desire to bust people who work very hard and have very strong natural gifts down in favor of “likable average Joes”—and it’s disturbing because the subtext is frequently that to be “likable” and “average” you have to have other traits that are comforting and appealing to an “average Joe” audience, like white skin and an American accent.

    - Arthur Chu to Ken Jennings (via pushinghoopswithsticks)

    My duuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuude.

    (via cordjefferson)

    Science, Mr. White

    (via nickdouglas)

    woah

    (via zombiecuddle)

    (via barryjenkins)